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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Radon-222 as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone found in the catalog.

Radon-222 as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone

Omar Snowden Hopkins

Radon-222 as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone

developing a detection technology

by Omar Snowden Hopkins

  • 397 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dense nonaqueous phase liquids -- Analysis.,
  • Radon.,
  • Groundwater tracers.,
  • Groundwater -- Pollution -- Measurement.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Omar Snowden Hopkins.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination94 leaves, bound. :
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15390127M

    EPA//R/ Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids A Workshop Summary Dallas, Texas April , Agency -i2J):cyard, 12th Floor Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency .   If non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) is present in the well, notify the DERR site coordinator and refer to FSOP , Detection and Sampling of Nonaqueous Phase Liquids in Monitoring Wells. If the well screen contains sediment accumulation greater than 5% of its length.

    For shorter life spans, the concentration profile is contained in a narrow zone below the water table. References J. R. Hunt, N. Sitar, and K. S. Udell Nonaqueous phase liquid . Partitioning Tracers for In-Situ Measurement of Nonaqueous Phase Liquids in the Subsurface M.L. Brusseau, et al. Krypton and Sulfur Hexafluoride as Non Aqueous Phase Liquid Partitioning Tracers in the Saturated Zone. Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Tests Using Radon to Quantify Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Contamination.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Compilation of Saturated and Unsaturated Zone Modeling Software (6 pp, 28 KB) (EPA//SR/) March Top of page. Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids and Flux-Based Site Remediation. Assessment and Delineation of DNAPL Source Zones at Hazardous Waste Sites – Ground Water Issue (EPA//R/) September – Abstract.


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Radon-222 as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone by Omar Snowden Hopkins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Radon gas has unique properties allowing it to be used as an indicator for the presence of organic phase liquids in the saturated zone. It naturally occurs in soils.

It is radioactive, making quantitative detection straight forward. A noble gas, it is chemically inert and does not react with aquifer by: 5. The potential use of the naturally occurring noble gas Rn as a and for describing lateral or vertical extensions of con- tracer for vadose zone contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids taminant vapor plumes emanating from them (Robbins.

Graduation date: Radon gas has unique properties allowing it to be used as an indicator for the\ud presence of organic phase liquids in the saturated zone. It naturally occurs in soils.

It is\ud radioactive, making quantitative detection straight forward. A noble gas, it is chemically\ud inert and does not react with aquifer media.

Static and Push‐Pull Methods Using Radon‐ to Characterize Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Saturations study of using naturally occurring radon to assess the dense non-aqueous phase liquid distribution in saturated zone W.J. Chuang and J.Y. Yao, Radon as a Complementary Well‐Purging Indicator for Sampling Volatile Cited by: Using radon in soil gas as an indicator of subsurface contamination by non-aqueous phase-liquid (NAPLs).

Tasker, B. R.:Radon as an indicator for a nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone: a numerical methods analysis, Engineering Report, MS Degree, Department of Civil Engineering, Oregon State University. Final Report: Radon Method for Locating and Quantifying Contamination by Residual Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids in the Subsurface.

EPA Grant Number: RC Subproject: this is subproject numberestablished and managed by the Center Director under grant R (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Radon as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone: a numerical methods analysis. Master's Engineering Report, (). Radon deficit for locating and quantifying NAPL contamination in the subsurface.

Using radon in soil gas as an indicator of subsurface contamination by non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPLs) M. Schubert, K. Freyer, H. Treutler and H. Weiss UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig–Halle, Germany Received: September 5, ; accepted: RESUMEN. Over the past two decades, naturally occurring radon ( Rn) gas has been considered as a possible indicator for NAPL localization and quantification in both the vadose zone (Schubert et al.

Radon gas has unique properties allowing it to be used as an indicator for the presence of organic phase liquids in the saturated zone. It naturally occurs in soils. Yao-Tsung Chen, Tien-Hsing Tung, Lung-Chang Wang, Chih-Jen Lu, Field study of using naturally occurring radon to assess the dense non-aqueous phase liquid distribution in saturated zone, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, /d,(), ().

The Flow of Nonaqueous Phase Liquids. Flow in the unsaturated zone is an example of multiphase flow, because more than one fluid phase is present (i.e., air and water).

An additional, immiscible fluid phase occurs when NAPL enters porous media, for example after liquid hydrocarbon fuels or solvents are spilled on the ground surface or leak.

The use of Rn, a naturally occurring radioactive isotope, was investigated as a partitioning tracer to detect and quantify the amount of non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in contaminated aquifers.

Diesel fuel was chosen as a model NAPL. The diesel fuel−water partition coefficient for Rn was 40 ±in bottles containing diesel fuel and water at 12 °C. Introduction [2] The presence of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at a site is a critical factor in the design and efficacy of any site remediation strategy [Mackay and Cherry, ].When released into an aquifer, a DNAPL can become entrapped as discontinuous ganglia [U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency (), ; Mercer and Cohen, ] and accumulate in higher saturation pools at. Partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) have emerged as a useful tool in characterizing the volume of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in contaminated aquifers.

More than 40 PITTs have been conducted in various NAPL-contaminated sites for both initial estimation of NAPL volume and postremediation performance assessment of various cleanup technologies.

solved and vapor-phase gases can be used to investigate physical and chemical processes affecting dissolved gas concentrations in the subsurface. For example, Blicher-Mathiesen et al. [] showed that in the saturated zone naturally occurring dissolved Ar could be used to quantify degassing occurring in response to denitrification in a.

and handling of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), including light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) and dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that may be present in ground water monitoring wells at contaminated sites.

NAPLs are organic liquids that exist as a separate, relatively immiscible phase when in contact with water. Naturally occurring radon in ground water can potentially be used as an in situ partitioning tracer to characterize dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) saturations.

The static method involves comparing radon concentrations in water samples from DNAPL-contaminated and non-contaminated portions of an aquifer. United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response EPA//S/ July &EPA Ground Water Issue Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquids Charles J.

Newell,* Steven D. Acree,** Randall R. Ross/ and Scott G. Huling** The Regional Superfund Ground-Water Forum is a group of scientists representing EPA's. Radon as an indicator for nonaqueous phase liquids in the saturated zone: developing a detection technology.

M.S. Thesis. Department of Civil Engineering. Michael Schubert, Axel Schmidt, Kai Müller, Holger Weiss, Using radon as indicator for the evaluation of the efficiency of groundwater remediation by in situ air sparging, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, /d,2, (), ().P.A.

Holden, N. Fierer, in Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment, Physical and Chemical Characteristics Affecting Vadose-Zone Microbial Ecology. The vadose zone is an open, multiphase system (Figure 3b) containing dissolved and undissolved solids (organomineral complexes and biomass), liquids (water and nonaqueous-phase liquid pollutants), and gases (also known as soil gases).